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Jay Wile
Member since 05/2011
Jay Wile learned about his love for chemistry when his dedicated parents bought him his first chemistry set. Many stink bombs and a few explosions later, he was hooked! Although he loved chemistry, he also had many other interests. For a while, he thought about becoming a concert pianist, but unfortunately, his fingers were not long enough (no kidding!). As he was finishing up his high school years, he became extremely interested in the theater and began to pursue a career in acting. Partly because he learned the science behind some of the special effects of the plays in which he performed, he eventually went back to his first love: chemistry. He went to the University of Rochester in upstate New York to study chemistry, and while he was there, he began working on nuclear chemistry experiments. He became so fascinated with nuclear chemistry that he stayed at the University of Rochester and got a Ph.D. in that field. For several years, he did research in the field under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. This research led to several grants and many publications. While doing research, Dr. Wile was also an assistant professor of chemistry. Dr. Wile's love of science is demonstrated by the many awards he has won for excellence in teaching and research. He has also presented numerous lectures on the topics of Nuclear Chemistry, Christian Apologetics, Homeschooling, and Creation vs. Evolution. He has published more than 30 articles on these subjects in nationally-recognized, peer-reviewed journals, and has 9 books to his credit, most of which belong to the award-winning “Exploring Creation with” series of junior-high and high-school science courses. Dr. Wile and his wife of more than 25 years, Kathleen, homeschooled their daughter, Dawn, from the time they adopted her until she graduated high school. Dawn is a Butler University graduate and is currently working in the field of veterinary medicine.

My Mission Statement

My mission is to help parents understand that they can homeschool their children all the way through high school.

Honorarium

Negotiable

Past Engagements/Seminars

"MassHOPE Homeschool Convention " Worcester, MA - 4/2011

"APACHE Homeschool Convention" Peoria, IL - 4/2011

"Midwest Homeschool Convention" Cincinnati, OH - 3/2011

"Southeast Homeschool Convention" Greenville, SC - 3/2011

"Midsouth Homeschool Convention" Memphis, TN - 3/2011

"Old Schoolhouse Online Convention" Worldwide - 10/2010

"WATCH Homeschool Convention" Seattle, WA - 8/2010

"HEN Summer Conference & Resource Fair" Omaha, NE - 7/2010

"Veritas Academy Scholars Training" Worldwide online - 7/2010

"SCOPE" Sacramento, CA - 6/2010

"FWAHS" Fort Wayne, IN - 5/2010

"SHEM" Springfield, MO - 4/2010

"HOME" Rockport, Maine - 3/2010

"KAHSA" Kalamazoo, MI - 3/2010

"Family Education Conference" Chang Mai, Thailand - 2/2010

"IAHE" Indianapolis, IN - 2/2010

"IDEA Families" Several Cities in Alaska - 1/2010

"TCHEN" Santa Rosa, CA - 6/2009

"CHAP" Harrisburg, PA - 5/2009

"FPEA" Orlando, FL - 5/2009

Publications

Exploring Creation With General Science

This course is targeted for 7th grade homeschooled students, although it can be used for eighth grade, especially if the student has recently left the public schools. It is designed to be a student’s first systematic introduction to science. Covering such topics as the scientific method, designing experiments, simple machines, archaeology, geology, paleontology, biology, and human anatomy and physiology, its scope is wide. It includes roughly 30 hours of laboratory instruction, including experiments in which the student builds a density column, investigates the surface tension of water, grows crystals, makes a fossil cast, builds a model of DNA, makes a self-sustaining ecosystem, cultures bacteria, and measures the vital capacity of his or her lungs.

Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 2000

Exploring Creation With Physical Science

This course gives the student an introduction to the physical environment and the laws that it follows. It covers the basics of atoms and their structure, molecules, the composition of air, earth’s atmosphere, earth’s hydrosphere, and earth’s lithosphere. The student also learns the basic structure of the planet and plate tectonics. Much of this information is then synthesized into a discussion of weather and its predictions. In the second half of the course, the student learns the basic equations of motion, Newton’s Laws, and the four fundamental forces of nature. As the student studies these topics, he is introduced to the structure of the solar system, an overview of the contents of the universe, radioactivity, nuclear fusion, and nuclear fission. The student must be at least taking prealgebra concurrently, as many of the topics discussed consist of mathematical calculations. Approximately 32 hours of the course are devoted to laboratory exercises. These experiments include the electrolytic decomposition of water, adiabatic expansion and contraction of air, making an electromagnet, weather prediction, a study of static electricity, free fall experiments, and making an electroscope.

Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 1999

Exploring Creation With Biology

with Marilyn Durnell

This laboratory-based, college-prep biology course is designed for the student who is beginning algebra. It provides a detailed introduction to the methods and concepts of general biology. Heavily emphasizing classification, this text is ideal preparation for a university-level biology course. It provides the student with a strong background in the scientific method, the five-kingdom classification scheme, microscopy, biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, evolution, dissection, and ecosystems. It also provides a complete overview of the organisms in all five kingdoms. The course covers 36 hours of lab instruction, 15 of which involve microscopy (pond life studies, analyses of prepared slides, plasmolysis, etc.), 15 of which involve general biology (enzyme activity, osmosis and diffusion, greenhouse effect, etc.), and 6 of which involve dissection (earthworm, crayfish, fish, and frog).

Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 1998

Exploring Creation with Physics

This course gives the student an introduction to the physical environment and the laws that it follows. It covers the basics of atoms and their structure, molecules, the composition of air, earth’s atmosphere, earth’s hydrosphere, and earth’s lithosphere. The student also learns the basic structure of the planet and plate tectonics. Much of this information is then synthesized into a discussion of weather and its predictions. In the second half of the course, the student learns the basic equations of motion, Newton’s Laws, and the four fundamental forces of nature. As the student studies these topics, he is introduced to the structure of the solar system, an overview of the contents of the universe, radioactivity, nuclear fusion, and nuclear fission. The student must be at least taking prealgebra concurrently, as many of the topics discussed consist of mathematical calculations. Approximately 32 hours of the course are devoted to laboratory exercises. These experiments include the electrolytic decomposition of water, adiabatic expansion and contraction of air, making an electromagnet, weather prediction, a study of static electricity, free fall experiments, and making an electroscope.

Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 1997

Exploring Creation With Chemistry

This college-prep chemistry course is designed for the student who has completed Algebra 1. It provides a detailed introduction to the methods and concepts of general chemistry. Heavily emphasizing stoichiometry, this text is ideal preparation for a university-level chemistry course. It provides the student with a strong background in nomenclature, significant figures, units, classification, the mole concept, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, acids and bases, redox reactions, solutions, atomic structure, Lewis structures, molecular geometry, the gas laws, and equilibria. The course covers roughly 36 hours of laboratory, including acid/base titrations, measuring the width of a molecule, calorimetry, the ideal gas law, limiting reactants, factors that affect reaction rate, and the conductivity of ionic and covalent compounds in water.

Apologia Educational Ministries 1995